Plantain, both broadleaf and narrowleaf are healing and nutritious.

The young, tender leaves can be eaten raw, the older leaves can be boiled in stews. 100 grams of plantain contain about the same amount of vitamin A as a large carrot.

 

       
 

 

Broadleaf plantain (right) and narrowleaf plantain (below) are native to most of Europe and Asia but have naturalised around the world. The Broadleaf plantain is one of the most abundant medicinal crops in the world. A poultice of the leaves can be applied to wounds, stings, and sores to reduce pain, heal and prevent infection. Broadleaf plantain is also a wild edible high in calcium and vitamins A, C, and K.

   
 
 
   
 
           

Here is a recipe for a balm [] made from plantain to use for skin irritations, cuts and dry skin in our Facebook natural living group. The young, tender leaves of plantain can be eaten raw, the older leaves can be boiled in stews. 100 grams of plantain contain about the same amount of vitamin A as a large carrot. Due to the high vitamin and mineral content, plantain tea can replenishes the nutrients lost as a result of diarrhoea. The tea also soothe a raw sore throat. In the video above you can learn about other uses of the plant and how to identify it.

 

Magnoliophyta: Magnoliopsida: Asteridae: Plantaginales: Plantaginaceae: Plantago L.: narrowleaf plantain and broadleaf plantain.